Students display entreprenuership projects

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Students display entreprenuership projects

photo by Audrey Sowers

photo by Audrey Sowers

photo by Audrey Sowers

Kristina Baca

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Thursday, September 19, Ms. Tammie Tubb’s Resource Management and Child Development classes held their first public Young Entrepreneurs event. This is something Tubbs does every year, but this was the first year her students had their projects on display for other students and staff.  

“The advantages of this project are students are learning how to budget and  save money, what it is like to own a business, and to be your true self,” Tubbs said.
This project boosted the students’ self-esteem by seeing and interacting with others who were interested in their business.  

 “I had several students who were super shy and timid and did not believe they could even own or operate a business, let alone sit down long enough to create a business plan,” Tubbs said. 

Each student who developed a project for the event had a sign-up sheet.  Students visiting the event signed their name on a sign-up sheet.  They could show their level of interest in the business by checking yes or no to a question on the sheet asking whether or not they would support the business.   

Libby Mattox is a Sophomore at Starkville High School.  She has worked on her business project for a week and a half. “I have learned that I can really make a business off of what I have been working on,” Mattox said.  Maddox made Champion shirts by getting the logo and ironing it onto a t-shirt.   She was pleasantly surprised by the number of students who indicated they would support her business. 

Other examples of business projects displayed at the event included a Hawaiian candy lei service, a hair extension and eyelash product business, and an adoption fund-raising agency. 

Tubbs said that observations from the different students [not in the class] going to their [ her students’]  tables, interacting with them, just with smiles on their faces, made her proud.
“It was just like, ‘Yes, I accomplished a mission! I accomplished something!